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PHENOTYPIC AND GENETIC CORRELATION BETWEEN SLEEP, BEHAVIOR, AND MACROSCALE CORTICAL GREY MATTER

By Masoud Tahmasian, Fateme Samea, Habibolah Khazaie, Mojtaba Zarei, Shahrzad Kharabian Masouleh, Felix Hoffstaedter, Julia A Camilleri, Peter Kochunov, B.T. Thomas Yeo, Simon B. Eickhoff, Sofie L. Valk

Posted 18 Sep 2019
bioRxiv DOI: 10.1101/772681

Humans need about 7 to 9 hours of sleep per night. Sleep habits are heritable, associated with brain function and structure, and intrinsically related to well-being, mental and physical health. This raises the question whether associations between sleep, mental and physical health can be attributed to a shared macroscale neurobiology. Combining neuroimaging and behavioral genetic approaches in two independent large-scale datasets (n=1887) we demonstrate phenotypic and genetic correspondence between sleep, intelligence, and BMI. Sleep was associated with local thickness variation in frontal, temporal, and occipital cortices. Using a comprehensive multivariate approach, we identified two robust latent components highlighting the interdigitation of sleep, intelligence, BMI, and depression and their shared relation to regions in unimodal and heteromodal association cortices. Latent relationships were heritable and driven by shared additive genetic factors. These observations provide a system-level perspective on the interrelation of sleep, mental, and physical conditions, anchored in grey-matter neuroanatomy.

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