Rxivist logo

Cancer develops through a process of somatic evolution. Here, we reconstruct the evolutionary history of 2,778 tumour samples from 2,658 donors spanning 39 cancer types. Characteristic copy number gains, such as trisomy 7 in glioblastoma or isochromosome 17q in medulloblastoma, are found amongst the earliest events in tumour evolution. The early phases of oncogenesis are driven by point mutations in a restricted set of cancer genes, often including biallelic inactivation of tumour suppressors. By contrast, increased genomic instability, a more than three-fold diversification of driver genes, and an acceleration of mutational processes are features of later stages. Clock-like mutations yield estimates for whole genome duplications and subclonal diversification in chronological time. Our results suggest that driver mutations often precede diagnosis by many years, and in some cases decades. Taken together, these data reveal common and divergent trajectories of cancer evolution, pivotal for understanding tumour biology and guiding early cancer detection.

Download data

  • Downloaded 9,346 times
  • Download rankings, all-time:
    • Site-wide: 313 out of 101,463
    • In cancer biology: 8 out of 3,645
  • Year to date:
    • Site-wide: 2,214 out of 101,463
  • Since beginning of last month:
    • Site-wide: 17,640 out of 101,463

Altmetric data


Downloads over time

Distribution of downloads per paper, site-wide


PanLingua

Sign up for the Rxivist weekly newsletter! (Click here for more details.)


News

  • 20 Oct 2020: Support for sorting preprints using Twitter activity has been removed, at least temporarily, until a new source of social media activity data becomes available.
  • 18 Dec 2019: We're pleased to announce PanLingua, a new tool that enables you to search for machine-translated bioRxiv preprints using more than 100 different languages.
  • 21 May 2019: PLOS Biology has published a community page about Rxivist.org and its design.
  • 10 May 2019: The paper analyzing the Rxivist dataset has been published at eLife.
  • 1 Mar 2019: We now have summary statistics about bioRxiv downloads and submissions.
  • 8 Feb 2019: Data from Altmetric is now available on the Rxivist details page for every preprint. Look for the "donut" under the download metrics.
  • 30 Jan 2019: preLights has featured the Rxivist preprint and written about our findings.
  • 22 Jan 2019: Nature just published an article about Rxivist and our data.
  • 13 Jan 2019: The Rxivist preprint is live!