Rxivist logo

Accounting for programmed ribosomal frameshifting in the computation of codon usage bias indices

By Victor Garcia, Stefan Zoller, Maria Anisimova

Posted 02 Apr 2018
bioRxiv DOI: 10.1101/293340 (published DOI: 10.1534/g3.118.200185)

Experimental evidence shows that synonymous mutations can have important consequences on genetic fitness. Many organisms display codon usage bias (CUB), where synonymous codons that are translated into the same amino acid appear with distinct frequency. CUB is thought to arise from selection for translational efficiency and accuracy, termed the translational efficiency hypothesis (TEH). Indeed, CUB indices correlate with protein expression levels, which is widely interpreted as evidence for translational selection. However, these tests neglect -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF), an important translational disruption effect found across all organisms of the tree of life. Genes that contain -1 PRF signals should cost more to express than genes without. Thus, CUB indices that do not consider -1 PRF may overestimate genes' true adaptation to translational efficiency and accuracy constraints. Here, we first investigate whether -1 PRF signals do indeed carry such translational cost. We then propose two corrections for CUB indices for genes containing -1 PRF signals. We retest the TEH under these corrections. We find that the correlation between corrected CUB index and protein expression remains intact for most levels of uniform -1 PRF efficiencies, and tends to increase when these efficiencies decline with protein expression. We conclude that the TEH is strengthened and that -1 PRF events constitute a promising and useful tool to examine the relationships between CUB and selection for translation efficiency and accuracy.

Download data

  • Downloaded 234 times
  • Download rankings, all-time:
    • Site-wide: 72,038 out of 100,819
    • In genetics: 3,836 out of 5,019
  • Year to date:
    • Site-wide: 82,157 out of 100,819
  • Since beginning of last month:
    • Site-wide: 78,662 out of 100,819

Altmetric data


Downloads over time

Distribution of downloads per paper, site-wide


PanLingua

Sign up for the Rxivist weekly newsletter! (Click here for more details.)


News

  • 20 Oct 2020: Support for sorting preprints using Twitter activity has been removed, at least temporarily, until a new source of social media activity data becomes available.
  • 18 Dec 2019: We're pleased to announce PanLingua, a new tool that enables you to search for machine-translated bioRxiv preprints using more than 100 different languages.
  • 21 May 2019: PLOS Biology has published a community page about Rxivist.org and its design.
  • 10 May 2019: The paper analyzing the Rxivist dataset has been published at eLife.
  • 1 Mar 2019: We now have summary statistics about bioRxiv downloads and submissions.
  • 8 Feb 2019: Data from Altmetric is now available on the Rxivist details page for every preprint. Look for the "donut" under the download metrics.
  • 30 Jan 2019: preLights has featured the Rxivist preprint and written about our findings.
  • 22 Jan 2019: Nature just published an article about Rxivist and our data.
  • 13 Jan 2019: The Rxivist preprint is live!