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Naturally-acquired Immunity Dynamics against SARS-CoV-2 in Children and Adolescents

By Tal Patalon, Yaki Saciuk, Hanit Ohayon Hadad, Galit Perez, Asaf Peretz, Amir Ben-Tov, Sivan Gazit

Posted 21 Jun 2022
medRxiv DOI: 10.1101/2022.06.20.22276650

Objectives: There are paucity of studies examining naturally acquired immunity against SARS-CoV-2 in children and adolescents, though they are generally the last group to be afforded the vaccine, and a significant portion of them are still unvaccinated. This study examined the duration of protection conferred by a previous SARS-CoV-2 infection amongst children and adolescents. Design: A retrospective study, applying two complementary approaches: a matched test-negative case control design and a retrospective cohort design. Setting: Nationally centralized database of Maccabi Healthcare Services, an Israeli national health fund that covers 2.5 million people. Participants: The study population included between 293,743 and 458,959 individuals (depending on the model), 5-18 years of age, who were unvaccinated SARS-CoV-2 naive persons or unvaccinated convalescent patients. Main outcomes and measures: Analyses focused on the period of July 1 to December 13, 2021, a Delta-dominant period in Israel. We evaluated three SARS-CoV-2-related outcomes: (1) documented PCR confirmed infection or reinfection, (2) COVID-19 and (3) severe COVID-19. Results: Overall, children and adolescents who were previously infected acquired durable protection against reinfection (symptomatic or not) with SARS-CoV-2 for at least 18 months. Importantly, no COVID-19 related deaths were recorded in either the SARS-CoV-2 naive group or the previously infected group. Effectiveness of naturally-acquired immunity against a recurrent infection reached 89.2% (95% CI: 84.7%-92.4%) three to six months after first infection, mildly declining to 82.5% (95% CI, 79.1%-85.3%) nine months to one year after infection, then remaining rather steady for children and adolescents for up to 18 months, with a slight non-significant waning trend. Additionally, we found that ages 5-11 exhibited no significant waning of naturally acquired protection throughout the outcome period, whereas waning protection in the 12-18 age group was more prominent, but still mild. Conclusions: Children and adolescents who were previously infected with SARS-CoV-2 remain protected against reinfection to a high degree for 18 months. Policy decision makers should consider when and if convalescent children and adolescents should be vaccinated. Nonetheless, further research is needed to examine naturally acquired immunity against emerging variants, including the Omicron.

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