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Rxivist combines preprints from bioRxiv with data from Twitter to help you find the papers being discussed in your field. Currently indexing 59,633 bioRxiv papers from 265,294 authors.

Most downloaded bioRxiv papers, since beginning of last month

58,183 results found. For more information, click each entry to expand.

1: An integrated brain-machine interface platform with thousands of channels
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Posted to bioRxiv 17 Jul 2019

An integrated brain-machine interface platform with thousands of channels
17,847 downloads neuroscience

Elon Musk, Neuralink

Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) hold promise for the restoration of sensory and motor function and the treatment of neurological disorders, but clinical BMIs have not yet been widely adopted, in part because modest channel counts have limited their potential. In this white paper, we describe Neuralink’s first steps toward a scalable high-bandwidth BMI system. We have built arrays of small and flexible electrode “threads”, with as many as 3,072 electrodes per array distributed across 96 threads. We have also built a neurosurgical robot capable of inserting six threads (192 electrodes) per minute. Each thread can be individually inserted into the brain with micron precision for avoidance of surface vasculature and targeting specific brain regions. The electrode array is packaged into a small implantable device that contains custom chips for low-power on-board amplification and digitization: the package for 3,072 channels occupies less than (23 × 18.5 × 2) mm3. A single USB-C cable provides full-bandwidth data streaming from the device, recording from all channels simultaneously. This system has achieved a spiking yield of up to 70% in chronically implanted electrodes. Neuralink’s approach to BMI has unprecedented packaging density and scalability in a clinically relevant package.

2: Isolation of an archaeon at the prokaryote-eukaryote interface
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Posted to bioRxiv 06 Aug 2019

Isolation of an archaeon at the prokaryote-eukaryote interface
17,349 downloads microbiology

Hiroyuki Imachi, Masaru K Nobu, Nozomi Nakahara, Yuki Morono, Miyuki Ogawara, Yoshihiro Takaki, Yoshinori Takano, Katsuyuki Uematsu, Tetsuro Ikuta, Motoo Ito, Yohei Matsui, Masayuki Miyazaki, Kazuyoshi Murata, Yumi Saito, Sanae Sakai, Chihong Song, Eiji Tasumi, Yuko Yamanaka, Takashi Yamaguchi, Yoichi Kamagata, Hideyuki Tamaki, Ken Takai

The origin of eukaryotes remains enigmatic. Current data suggests that eukaryotes may have risen from an archaeal lineage known as "Asgard archaea". Despite the eukaryote-like genomic features found in these archaea, the evolutionary transition from archaea to eukaryotes remains unclear due to the lack of cultured representatives and corresponding physiological insight. Here we report the decade-long isolation of a Lokiarchaeota-related Asgard archaeon from deep marine sediment. The archaeon, " Candidatus Prometheoarchaeum syntrophicum strain MK-D1", is an anaerobic, extremely slow-growing, small cocci (~550 nm), that degrades amino acids through syntrophy. Although eukaryote-like intracellular complexities have been proposed for Asgard archaea, the isolate has no visible organella-like structure. Ca . P. syntrophicum instead displays morphological complexity - unique long, and often, branching protrusions. Based on cultivation and genomics, we propose an "Entangle-Engulf-Enslave (E3) model" for eukaryogenesis through archaea-alphaproteobacteria symbiosis mediated by the physical complexities and metabolic dependency of the hosting archaeon.

3: Reversal of ageing- and injury-induced vision loss by Tet-dependent epigenetic reprogramming
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Posted to bioRxiv 31 Jul 2019

Reversal of ageing- and injury-induced vision loss by Tet-dependent epigenetic reprogramming
5,252 downloads molecular biology

Yuancheng Lu, Anitha Krishnan, Benedikt Brommer, Xiao Tian, Margarita Meer, Daniel L. Vera, Chen Wang, Qiurui Zeng, Doudou Yu, Michael S. Bonkowski, Jae-Hyun Yang, Emma M. Hoffmann, Songlin Zhou, Ekaterina Korobkina, Noah Davidsohn, Michael B. Schultz, Karolina Chwalek, Luis A. Rajman, George M Church, Konrad Hochedlinger, Vadim N Gladyshev, Steve Horvath, Meredith S. Gregory-Ksander, Bruce R. Ksander, Zhigang He, David A. Sinclair

Ageing is a degenerative process leading to tissue dysfunction and death. A proposed cause of ageing is the accumulation of epigenetic noise, which disrupts youthful gene expression patterns that are required for cells to function optimally and recover from damage. Changes to DNA methylation patterns over time form the basis of an 'ageing clock', but whether old individuals retain information to reset the clock and, if so, whether this would improve tissue function is not known. Of all the tissues in the body, the central nervous system (CNS) is one of the first to lose regenerative capacity. Using the eye as a model tissue, we show that expression of Oct4, Sox2, and Klf4 genes (OSK) in mice resets youthful gene expression patterns and the DNA methylation age of retinal ganglion cells, promotes axon regeneration after optic nerve crush injury, and restores vision in a mouse model of glaucoma and in normal old mice. This process, which we call recovery of information via epigenetic reprogramming or REVIVER, requires the DNA demethylases Tet1 and Tet2, indicating that DNA methylation patterns don't just indicate age, they participate in ageing. Thus, old tissues retain a faithful record of youthful epigenetic information that can be accessed for functional age reversal.

4: Automated Reconstruction of a Serial-Section EM Drosophila Brain with Flood-Filling Networks and Local Realignment
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Posted to bioRxiv 11 Apr 2019

Automated Reconstruction of a Serial-Section EM Drosophila Brain with Flood-Filling Networks and Local Realignment
4,355 downloads neuroscience

Peter H Li, Larry F. Lindsey, Michal Januszewski, Zhihao Zheng, Alexander Shakeel Bates, István Taisz, Mike Tyka, Matthew Nichols, Feng Li, Eric Perlman, Jeremy Maitin-Shepard, Tim Blakely, Laramie Leavitt, Gregory S.X.E. Jefferis, Davi Bock, Viren Jain

Reconstruction of neural circuitry at single-synapse resolution is an attractive target for improving understanding of the nervous system in health and disease. Serial section transmission electron microscopy (ssTEM) is among the most prolific imaging methods employed in pursuit of such reconstructions. We demonstrate how Flood-Filling Networks (FFNs) can be used to computationally segment a forty-teravoxel whole-brain Drosophila ssTEM volume. To compensate for data irregularities and imperfect global alignment, FFNs were combined with procedures that locally re-align serial sections and dynamically adjust image content. The proposed approach produced a largely merger-free segmentation of the entire ssTEM Drosophila brain, which we make freely available. As compared to manual tracing using an efficient skeletonization strategy, the segmentation enabled circuit reconstruction and analysis workflows that were an order of magnitude faster.

5: Supercentenarians and the oldest-old are concentrated into regions with no birth certificates and short lifespans
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Posted to bioRxiv 16 Jul 2019

Supercentenarians and the oldest-old are concentrated into regions with no birth certificates and short lifespans
3,998 downloads developmental biology

Saul Justin Newman

The observation of individuals attaining remarkable ages, and their concentration into geographic sub-regions or 'blue zones', has generated considerable scientific interest. Proposed drivers of remarkable longevity include high vegetable intake, strong social connections, and genetic markers. Here, we reveal new predictors of remarkable longevity and 'supercentenarian' status. In the United States, supercentenarian status is predicted by the absence of vital registration. The state-specific introduction of birth certificates is associated with a 69-82% fall in the number of supercentenarian records. In Italy, which has more uniform vital registration, remarkable longevity is instead predicted by low per capita incomes and a short life expectancy. Finally, the designated 'blue zones' of Sardinia, Okinawa, and Ikaria corresponded to regions with low incomes, low literacy, high crime rate and short life expectancy relative to their national average. As such, relative poverty and short lifespan constitute unexpected predictors of centenarian and supercentenarian status, and support a primary role of fraud and error in generating remarkable human age records.

6: Octopi: Open configurable high-throughput imaging platform for infectious disease diagnosis in the field
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Posted to bioRxiv 27 Jun 2019

Octopi: Open configurable high-throughput imaging platform for infectious disease diagnosis in the field
2,862 downloads bioengineering

Hongquan Li, Hazel Soto-Montoya, Maxime Voisin, Lucas Fuentes Valenzuela, Manu Prakash

Access to quantitative, robust, yet affordable diagnostic tools is necessary to reduce global infectious disease burden. Manual microscopy has served as a bedrock for diagnostics with wide adaptability, although at a cost of tedious labor and human errors. Automated robotic microscopes are poised to enable a new era of smart field microscopy but current platforms remain cost prohibitive and largely inflexible, especially for resource poor and field settings. Here we present Octopi, a low-cost ($250-$500) and reconfigurable autonomous microscopy platform capable of automated slide scanning and correlated bright-field and fluorescence imaging. Being highly modular, it also provides a framework for new disease-specific modules to be developed. We demonstrate the power of the platform by applying it to automated detection of malaria parasites in blood smears. Specifically, we discovered a spectral shift on the order of 10 nm for DAPI-stained Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites. This shift allowed us to detect the parasites with a low magnification (equivalent to 10x) large field of view (2.56 mm^2) module. Combined with automated slide scanning, real time computer vision and machine learning-based classification, Octopi is able to screen more than 1.5 million red blood cells per minute for parasitemia quantification, with estimated diagnostic sensitivity and specificity exceeding 90% at parasitemia of 50/ul and 100% for parasitemia higher than 150/μl. With different modules, we further showed imaging of tissue slice and sputum sample on the platform. With roughly two orders of magnitude in cost reduction, Octopi opens up the possibility of a large robotic microscope network for improved disease diagnosis while providing an avenue for collective efforts for development of modular instruments.

7: The Genomic Formation of South and Central Asia
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Posted to bioRxiv 31 Mar 2018

The Genomic Formation of South and Central Asia
2,394 downloads genomics

Vagheesh M Narasimhan, Nick Patterson, Priya Moorjani, Iosif Lazaridis, Mark Lipson, Swapan Mallick, Nadin Rohland, Rebecca Bernardos, Alexander M Kim, Nathan Nakatsuka, Iñigo Olalde, Alfredo Coppa, James Mallory, Vyacheslav Moiseyev, Janet Monge, Luca M Olivieri, Nicole Adamski, Nasreen Broomandkhoshbacht, Francesca Candilio, Olivia Cheronet, Brendan J Culleton, Matthew Ferry, Daniel Fernandes, Beatriz Gamarra, Daniel Gaudio, Mateja Hajdinjak, Éadaoin Harney, Thomas K Harper, Denise Keating, Ann Marie Lawson, Megan Michel, Mario Novak, Jonas Oppenheimer, Niraj Rai, Kendra Sirak, Viviane Slon, Kristin Stewardson, Zhao Zhang, Gaziz Akhatov, Anatoly N Bagashev, Bauryzhan Baitanayev, Gian Luca Bonora, Tatiana Chikisheva, Anatoly Derevianko, Enshin Dmitry, Katerina Douka, Nadezhda Dubova, Andrey Epimakhov, Suzanne Freilich, Dorian Fuller, Alexander Goryachev, Andrey Gromov, Bryan Hanks, Margaret Judd, Erlan Kazizov, Aleksander Khokhlov, Egor Kitov, Elena Kupriyanova, Pavel Kuznetsov, Donata Luiselli, Farhod Maksudov, Christopher Meiklejohn, Deborah Merrett, Roberto Micheli, Oleg Mochalov, Zahir Muhammed, Samariddin Mustafokulov, Ayushi Nayak, Rykun M Petrovna, Davide Pettener, Richard Potts, Dmitry Razhev, Stefania Sarno, Kulyan Sikhymbaeva, Sergey M Slepchenko, Nadezhda Stepanova, Svetlana Svyatko, Sergey Vasilyev, Massimo Vidale, Dmitriy Voyakin, Antonina Yermolayeva, Alisa Zubova, Vasant S Shinde, Carles Lalueza-Fox, Matthias Meyer, David Anthony, Nicole Boivin, Kumarasamy Thangaraj, Douglas J. Kennett, Michael Frachetti, Ron Pinhasi, David Reich

The genetic formation of Central and South Asian populations has been unclear because of an absence of ancient DNA. To address this gap, we generated genome-wide data from 362 ancient individuals, including the first from eastern Iran, Turan (Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, and Tajikistan), Bronze Age Kazakhstan, and South Asia. Our data reveal a complex set of genetic sources that ultimately combined to form the ancestry of South Asians today. We document a southward spread of genetic ancestry from the Eurasian Steppe, correlating with the archaeologically known expansion of pastoralist sites from the Steppe to Turan in the Middle Bronze Age (2300-1500 BCE). These Steppe communities mixed genetically with peoples of the Bactria Margiana Archaeological Complex (BMAC) whom they encountered in Turan (primarily descendants of earlier agriculturalists of Iran), but there is no evidence that the main BMAC population contributed genetically to later South Asians. Instead, Steppe communities integrated farther south throughout the 2nd millennium BCE, and we show that they mixed with a more southern population that we document at multiple sites as outlier individuals exhibiting a distinctive mixture of ancestry related to Iranian agriculturalists and South Asian hunter-gathers. We call this group Indus Periphery because they were found at sites in cultural contact with the Indus Valley Civilization (IVC) and along its northern fringe, and also because they were genetically similar to post-IVC groups in the Swat Valley of Pakistan. By co-analyzing ancient DNA and genomic data from diverse present-day South Asians, we show that Indus Periphery-related people are the single most important source of ancestry in South Asia — consistent with the idea that the Indus Periphery individuals are providing us with the first direct look at the ancestry of peoples of the IVC — and we develop a model for the formation of present-day South Asians in terms of the temporally and geographically proximate sources of Indus Periphery-related, Steppe, and local South Asian hunter-gatherer-related ancestry. Our results show how ancestry from the Steppe genetically linked Europe and South Asia in the Bronze Age, and identifies the populations that almost certainly were responsible for spreading Indo-European languages across much of Eurasia.

8: Toxicity of JUUL Fluids and Aerosols Correlates Strongly with Nicotine and Some Flavor Chemical Concentrations
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Posted to bioRxiv 09 Dec 2018

Toxicity of JUUL Fluids and Aerosols Correlates Strongly with Nicotine and Some Flavor Chemical Concentrations
2,372 downloads pharmacology and toxicology

Esther Omaiye, Kevin J McWhirter, Wentai Luo, James F Pankow, Prue Talbot

While JUUL electronic cigarettes (ECs) have captured the majority of the EC market with a large fraction of their sales going to adolescents, little is known about their cytotoxicity and potential effects on health. The purpose of this study was to determine flavor chemical and nicotine concentrations in the eight currently marketed pre-filled JUUL EC cartridges (pods) and to evaluate the cytotoxicity of the different variants (e.g., Cool Mint and Creme Brulee) using in vitro assays. Nicotine and flavor chemicals were analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in pod fluid before and after vaping and in the corresponding aerosols. 59 flavor chemicals were identified in JUUL pod fluids, and three were >1 mg/mL. Duplicate pods were similar in flavor chemical composition and concentration. Nicotine concentrations (average 60.9 mg/mL) were significantly higher than any EC products we have analyzed previously. Transfer efficiency of individual flavor chemicals that were >1mg/mL and nicotine from the pod fluid into aerosols was generally 35 - 80%. All pod fluids were cytotoxic at a 1:10 dilution (10%) in the MTT and neutral red uptake assays when tested with BEAS-2B lung epithelial cells. Most aerosols were cytotoxic in these assays at concentrations >1%. The cytotoxicity of aerosols was highly correlated with nicotine and ethyl maltol concentrations and moderately to weakly correlated with total flavor chemical concentration and menthol concentration. Our study demonstrates that: (1) some JUUL flavor pods have high concentrations of flavor chemicals that may make them attractive to youth, and (2) the concentrations of nicotine and some flavor chemicals (e.g. ethyl maltol) are high enough to be cytotoxic in acute in vitro assays, emphasizing the need to determine if JUUL products will lead to adverse health effects with chronic use.

9: Assessment of computational methods for the analysis of single-cell ATAC-seq data
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Posted to bioRxiv 18 Aug 2019

Assessment of computational methods for the analysis of single-cell ATAC-seq data
2,350 downloads bioinformatics

Huidong Chen, Caleb Lareau, Tommaso Andreani, Michael E. Vinyard, Sara P. Garcia, Kendell Clement, Miguel A. Andrade-Navarro, Jason Daniel Buenrostro, Luca Pinello

Background: Recent innovations in single-cell Assay for Transposase Accessible Chromatin using sequencing (scATAC-seq) enable profiling of the epigenetic landscape of thousands of individual cells. scATAC-seq data analysis presents unique methodological challenges. scATAC-seq experiments sample DNA, which, due to low copy numbers (diploid in humans) lead to inherent data sparsity (1-10% of peaks detected per cell) compared to transcriptomic (scRNA-seq) data (20-50% of expressed genes detected per cell). Such challenges in data generation emphasize the need for informative features to assess cell heterogeneity at the chromatin level. Results: We present a benchmarking framework that was applied to 10 computational methods for scATAC-seq on 13 synthetic and real datasets from different assays, profiling cell types from diverse tissues and organisms. Methods for processing and featurizing scATAC-seq data were evaluated by their ability to discriminate cell types when combined with common unsupervised clustering approaches. We rank evaluated methods and discuss computational challenges associated with scATAC-seq analysis including inherently sparse data, determination of features, peak calling, the effects of sequencing coverage and noise, and clustering performance. Running times and memory requirements are also discussed. Conclusions: This reference summary of scATAC-seq methods offers recommendations for best practices with consideration for both the non-expert user and the methods developer. Despite variation across methods and datasets, SnapATAC, Cusanovich2018, and cisTopic outperform other methods in separating cell populations of different coverages and noise levels in both synthetic and real datasets. Notably, SnapATAC was the only method able to analyze a large dataset (> 80,000 cells).

10: A molecular cell atlas of the human lung from single cell RNA sequencing
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Posted to bioRxiv 27 Aug 2019

A molecular cell atlas of the human lung from single cell RNA sequencing
2,229 downloads genomics

Kyle J Travaglini, Ahmad N Nabhan, Lolita Penland, Rahul Sinha, Astrid Gillich, Rene V Sit, Stephen Chang, Stephanie D Conley, Yasuo Mori, Jun Seita, Gerald J. Berry, Joseph B Shrager, Ross J Metzger, Christin S Kuo, Norma Neff, Irving L Weissman, Stephen R. Quake, Mark A Krasnow

Although single cell RNA sequencing studies have begun providing compendia of cell expression profiles, it has proven more difficult to systematically identify and localize all molecular cell types in individual organs to create a full molecular cell atlas. Here we describe droplet- and plate-based single cell RNA sequencing applied to ~70,000 human lung and blood cells, combined with a multi-pronged cell annotation approach, which have allowed us to define the gene expression profiles and anatomical locations of 58 cell populations in the human lung, including 41 of 45 previously known cell types or subtypes and 14 new ones. This comprehensive molecular atlas elucidates the biochemical functions of lung cell types and the cell-selective transcription factors and optimal markers for making and monitoring them; defines the cell targets of circulating hormones and predicts local signaling interactions including sources and targets of chemokines in immune cell trafficking and expression changes on lung homing; and identifies the cell types directly affected by lung disease genes. Comparison to mouse identified 17 molecular types that appear to have been gained or lost during lung evolution and others whose expression profiles have been substantially altered, revealing extensive plasticity of cell types and cell-type-specific gene expression during organ evolution including expression switches between cell types. This lung atlas provides the molecular foundation for investigating how lung cell identities, functions, and interactions are achieved in development and tissue engineering and altered in disease and evolution.

11: Small molecules for modulating protein driven liquid-liquid phase separation in treating neurodegenerative disease
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Posted to bioRxiv 05 Aug 2019

Small molecules for modulating protein driven liquid-liquid phase separation in treating neurodegenerative disease
2,153 downloads cell biology

Richard J Wheeler, Hyun O Lee, Ina Poser, Arun Pal, Thom Doeleman, Satoshi Kishigami, Sukhleen Kour, Eric Nathaniel Anderson, Lara Marrone, Anastasia C Murthy, Marcus Jahnel, Xiaojie Zhang, Edgar Boczek, Anatol Fritsch, Nicolas L Fawzi, Jared Sterneckert, Udai Pandey, Della C David, Benjamin G Davis, Andrew J. Baldwin, Andreas Hermann, Marc Bickle, Simon Alberti, Anthony A Hyman

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease with few avenues for treatment. Many proteins implicated in ALS associate with stress granules, which are examples of liquid-like compartments formed by phase separation. Aberrant phase transition of stress granules has been implicated in disease, suggesting that modulation of phase transitions could be a possible therapeutic route. Here, we combine cell-based and protein-based screens to show that lipoamide, and its related compound lipoic acid, reduce the propensity of stress granule proteins to aggregate in vitro. More significantly, they also prevented aggregation of proteins over the life time of Caenorhabditis elegans. Observations that they prevent dieback of ALS patient-derived (FUS mutant) motor neuron axons in culture and recover motor defects in Drosophila melanogaster expressing FUS mutants suggest plausibility as effective therapeutics. Our results suggest that altering phase behaviour of stress granule proteins in the cytoplasm could be a novel route to treat ALS.

12: In Situ Transcriptome Accessibility Sequencing (INSTA-seq)
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Posted to bioRxiv 05 Aug 2019

In Situ Transcriptome Accessibility Sequencing (INSTA-seq)
2,120 downloads genomics

Daniel Furth, Victor Hatini, Je H. Lee

Subcellular RNA localization regulates spatially polarized cellular processes, but unbiased investigation of its control in vivo remains challenging. Current hybridization-based methods cannot differentiate small regulatory variants, while in situ sequencing is limited by short reads. We solved these problems using a bidirectional sequencing chemistry to efficiently image transcript-specific barcode in situ, which are then extracted and assembled into longer reads using NGS. In the Drosophila retina, genes regulating eye development and cytoskeletal organization were enriched compared to methods using extracted RNA. We therefore named our method In Situ Transcriptome Accessibility sequencing (INSTA-seq). Sequencing reads terminated near 3' UTR cis-motifs (e.g. Zip48C, stau), revealing RNA-protein interactions. Additionally, Act5C polyadenylation isoforms retaining zipcode motifs were selectively localized to the optical stalk, consistent with their biology. Our platform provides a powerful way to visualize any RNA variants or protein interactions in situ to study their regulation in animal development.

13: Efficient de novo assembly of eleven human genomes using PromethION sequencing and a novel nanopore toolkit
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Posted to bioRxiv 26 Jul 2019

Efficient de novo assembly of eleven human genomes using PromethION sequencing and a novel nanopore toolkit
2,062 downloads bioinformatics

Kishwar Shafin, Trevor Pesout, Ryan Lorig-Roach, Marina Haukness, Hugh E Olsen, Colleen Bosworth, Joel Armstrong, Kristof Tigyi, Nicholas Maurer, Sergey Koren, Fritz J. Sedlazeck, Tobias Marschall, Simon Mayes, Vania Costa, Justin M Zook, Kelvin J Liu, Duncan Kilburn, Melanie Sorensen, Katy M Munson, Mitchell R. Vollger, Evan E Eichler, Sofie Salama, David Haussler, Richard E. Green, Mark Akeson, Adam Phillippy, Karen H Miga, Paolo Carnevali, Miten Jain, Benedict Paten

Present workflows for producing human genome assemblies from long-read technologies have cost and production time bottlenecks that prohibit efficient scaling to large cohorts. We demonstrate an optimized PromethION nanopore sequencing method for eleven human genomes. The sequencing, performed on one machine in nine days, achieved an average 63x coverage, 42 Kb read N50, 90% median read identity and 6.5x coverage in 100 Kb+ reads using just three flow cells per sample. To assemble these data we introduce new computational tools: Shasta - a de novo long read assembler, and MarginPolish & HELEN - a suite of nanopore assembly polishing algorithms. On a single commercial compute node Shasta can produce a complete human genome assembly in under six hours, and MarginPolish & HELEN can polish the result in just over a day, achieving 99.9% identity (QV30) for haploid samples from nanopore reads alone. We evaluate assembly performance for diploid, haploid and trio-binned human samples in terms of accuracy, cost, and time and demonstrate improvements relative to current state-of-the-art methods in all areas. We further show that addition of proximity ligation (Hi-C) sequencing yields near chromosome-level scaffolds for all eleven genomes.

14: Report of Partial findings from the National Toxicology Program Carcinogenesis Studies of Cell Phone Radiofrequency Radiation in Hsd: Sprague Dawley® SD rats (Whole Body Exposure)
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Posted to bioRxiv 26 May 2016

Report of Partial findings from the National Toxicology Program Carcinogenesis Studies of Cell Phone Radiofrequency Radiation in Hsd: Sprague Dawley® SD rats (Whole Body Exposure)
2,051 downloads cancer biology

Michael Wyde, Mark Cesta, Chad Blystone, Susan Elmore, Paul Foster, Michelle Hooth, Grace Kissling, David Malarkey, Robert Sills, Matthew Stout, Nigel Walker, Kristine Witt, Mary Wolfe, John Bucher

The U.S. National Toxicology Program (NTP) has carried out extensive rodent toxicology and carcinogenesis studies of radiofrequency radiation (RFR) at frequencies and modulations used in the U.S. telecommunications industry. This report presents partial findings from these studies. The occurrences of two tumor types in male Harlan Sprague Dawley rats exposed to RFR, malignant gliomas in the brain and schwannomas of the heart, were considered of particular interest and are the subject of this report. The findings in this report were reviewed by expert peer reviewers selected by the NTP and National Institutes of Health (NIH). These reviews and responses to comments are included as appendices to this report, and revisions to the current document have incorporated and addressed these comments. When the studies are completed, they will undergo additional peer review before publication in full as part of the NTP's Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Technical Reports Series. No portion of this work has been submitted for publication in a scientific journal. Supplemental information in the form of four additional manuscripts has or will soon be submitted for publication. These manuscripts describe in detail the designs and performance of the RFR exposure system, the dosimetry of RFR exposures in rats and mice, the results to a series of pilot studies establishing the ability of the animals to thermoregulate during RFR exposures, and studies of DNA damage. (1) Capstick M, Kuster N, Kuhn S, Berdinas-Torres V, Wilson P, Ladbury J, Koepke G, McCormick D, Gauger J, and Melnick R. A radio frequency radiation reverberation chamber exposure system for rodents; (2) Yijian G, Capstick M, McCormick D, Gauger J, Horn T, Wilson P, Melnick RL, and Kuster N. Life time dosimetric assessment for mice and rats exposed to cell phone radiation; (3) Wyde ME, Horn TL, Capstick M, Ladbury J, Koepke G, Wilson P, Stout MD, Kuster N, Melnick R, Bucher JR, and McCormick D. Pilot studies of the National Toxicology Program's cell phone radiofrequency radiation reverberation chamber exposure system; (4) Smith-Roe SL, Wyde ME, Stout MD, Winters J, Hobbs CA, Shepard KG, Green A, Kissling GE, Tice RR, Bucher JR, and Witt KL. Evaluation of the genotoxicity of cell phone radiofrequency radiation in male and female rats and mice following subchronic exposure.

15: Telomere-to-telomere assembly of a complete human X chromosome
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Posted to bioRxiv 16 Aug 2019

Telomere-to-telomere assembly of a complete human X chromosome
2,013 downloads bioinformatics

Karen H Miga, Sergey Koren, Arang Rhie, Mitchell R. Vollger, Ariel Gershman, Andrey Bzikadze, Shelise Brooks, Edmund Howe, David Porubsky, Glennis A. Logsdon, Valerie A Schneider, Tamara Potapova, Jonathan Wood, William Chow, Joel Armstrong, Jeanne Fredrickson, Evgenia Pak, Kristof Tigyi, Milinn Kremitzki, Christopher Markovic, Valerie Maduro, Amalia Dutra, Gerard G Bouffard, Alexander M Chang, Nancy F Hansen, Françoisen Thibaud-Nissen, Anthony D Schmitt, Jon-Matthew Belton, Siddarth Selvaraj, Megan Y. Dennis, Daniela C Soto, Ruta Sahasrabudhe, Gulhan Kaya, Josh Quick, Nicholas J Loman, Nadine Holmes, Matthew Loose, Urvashi Surti, Rosa ana Risques, Tina A. Graves Lindsay, Robert Fulton, Ira Hall, Benedict Paten, Kerstin Howe, Winston Timp, Alice Young, James C. Mullikin, Pavel A Pevzner, Jennifer E. Gerton, Beth A Sullivan, Evan E Eichler, Adam M Phillippy

After nearly two decades of improvements, the current human reference genome (GRCh38) is the most accurate and complete vertebrate genome ever produced. However, no one chromosome has been finished end to end, and hundreds of unresolved gaps persist [1][1],[2][2]. The remaining gaps include ribosomal rDNA arrays, large near-identical segmental duplications, and satellite DNA arrays. These regions harbor largely unexplored variation of unknown consequence, and their absence from the current reference genome can lead to experimental artifacts and hide true variants when re-sequencing additional human genomes. Here we present a de novo human genome assembly that surpasses the continuity of GRCh38 [2][2], along with the first gapless, telomere-to-telomere assembly of a human chromosome. This was enabled by high-coverage, ultra-long-read nanopore sequencing of the complete hydatidiform mole CHM13 genome, combined with complementary technologies for quality improvement and validation. Focusing our efforts on the human X chromosome [3][3], we reconstructed the ∼2.8 megabase centromeric satellite DNA array and closed all 29 remaining gaps in the current reference, including new sequence from the human pseudoautosomal regions and cancer-testis ampliconic gene families (CT-X and GAGE). This complete chromosome X, combined with the ultra-long nanopore data, also allowed us to map methylation patterns across complex tandem repeats and satellite arrays for the first time. These results demonstrate that finishing the human genome is now within reach and will enable ongoing efforts to complete the remaining human chromosomes. [1]: #ref-1 [2]: #ref-2 [3]: #ref-3

16: Sex Chromosome Dosage Effects On Gene Expression In Humans
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Posted to bioRxiv 14 May 2017

Sex Chromosome Dosage Effects On Gene Expression In Humans
1,915 downloads genomics

Armin Raznahan, Neelroop Parikshak, Vijayendran Chandran, Jonathan Blumenthal, Liv Clasen, Aaron Alexander-Bloch, Andrew Zinn, Danny Wangsa, Jasen Wise, Declan Murphy, Patrick Bolton, Thomas Ried, Judith Ross, Jay Giedd, Daniel Geschwind

A fundamental question in the biology of sex-differences has eluded direct study in humans: how does sex chromosome dosage (SCD) shape genome function? To address this, we developed a systematic map of SCD effects on gene function by analyzing genome-wide expression data in humans with diverse sex chromosome aneuploidies (XO, XXX, XXY, XYY, XXYY). For sex chromosomes, we demonstrate a pattern of obligate dosage sensitivity amongst evolutionarily preserved X-Y homologs, and update prevailing theoretical models for SCD compensation by detecting X-linked genes whose expression increases with decreasing X- and/or Y-chromosome dosage. We further show that SCD-sensitive sex chromosome genes regulate specific co-expression networks of SCD-sensitive autosomal genes with critical cellular functions and a demonstrable potential to mediate previously documented SCD effects on disease. Our findings detail wide-ranging effects of SCD on genome function with implications for human phenotypic variation.

17: A guide to performing Polygenic Risk Score analyses
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Posted to bioRxiv 14 Sep 2018

A guide to performing Polygenic Risk Score analyses
1,878 downloads genomics

Shing Wan Choi, Timothy Mak, Paul F O'Reilly

The application of polygenic risk scores (PRS) has become routine in genetic epidemiological studies. Among a range of applications, PRS are commonly used to assess shared aetiology among different phenotypes and to evaluate the predictive power of genetic data, while they are also now being exploited as part of study design, in which experiments are performed on individuals, or their biological samples (eg. tissues, cells), at the tails of the PRS distribution and contrasted. As GWAS sample sizes increase and PRS become more powerful, they are also set to play a key role in personalised medicine. Despite their growing application and importance, there are limited guidelines for performing PRS analyses, which can lead to inconsistency between studies and misinterpretation of results. Here we provide detailed guidelines for performing polygenic risk score analyses relevant to different methods for their calculation, outlining standard quality control steps and offering recommendations for best-practice. We also discuss different methods for the calculation of PRS, common misconceptions regarding the interpretation of results and future challenges.

18: The Structural Basis of Indisulam-Mediated Recruitment of RBM39 to the DCAF15-DDB1-DDA1 E3 Ligase Complex
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Posted to bioRxiv 16 Aug 2019

The Structural Basis of Indisulam-Mediated Recruitment of RBM39 to the DCAF15-DDB1-DDA1 E3 Ligase Complex
1,857 downloads biophysics

Dirksen Bussiere, Lili Xie, Wei Shu, Honnappa Srinivas

The anti-cancer agent Indisulam inhibits cell proliferation by causing degradation of RBM39, an essential mRNA splicing factor. Indisulam promotes an interaction between RBM39 and the DCAF15 E3 ligase substrate receptor leading to RBM39 ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation. To delineate the precise mechanism by which Indisulam mediates DCAF15-RBM39 interaction, we solved the DCAF15-DDB1-DDA1-Indisulam-RBM39(RRM2) complex structure to 2.3 Angstroms. DCAF15 has a novel topology which embraces the RBM39(RRM2) domain largely via nonpolar interactions, and Indisulam binds between DCAF15 and RBM39(RRM2) and coordinates additional interactions between the two proteins. Studies with RBM39 point mutants and Indisulam analogs validated the structural model and defined the RBM39 alpha-helical degron motif. The degron is found only in RBM23 and RBM39 and only these proteins were detectably downregulated in Indisulam-treated HCT116 cells. This work further explains how Indisulam induces RBM39 degradation and defines the challenge of harnessing DCAF15 to degrade novel targets.

19: Comprehensive integration of single cell data
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Posted to bioRxiv 02 Nov 2018

Comprehensive integration of single cell data
1,775 downloads genomics

Tim Stuart, Andrew Butler, Paul Hoffman, Christoph Hafemeister, Efthymia Papalexi, William M. Mauck, Marlon Stoeckius, Peter Smibert, Rahul Satija

Single cell transcriptomics (scRNA-seq) has transformed our ability to discover and annotate cell types and states, but deep biological understanding requires more than a taxonomic listing of clusters. As new methods arise to measure distinct cellular modalities, including high-dimensional immunophenotypes, chromatin accessibility, and spatial positioning, a key analytical challenge is to integrate these datasets into a harmonized atlas that can be used to better understand cellular identity and function. Here, we develop a computational strategy to "anchor" diverse datasets together, enabling us to integrate and compare single cell measurements not only across scRNA-seq technologies, but different modalities as well. After demonstrating substantial improvement over existing methods for data integration, we anchor scRNA-seq experiments with scATAC-seq datasets to explore chromatin differences in closely related interneuron subsets, and project single cell protein measurements onto a human bone marrow atlas to annotate and characterize lymphocyte populations. Lastly, we demonstrate how anchoring can harmonize in-situ gene expression and scRNA-seq datasets, allowing for the transcriptome-wide imputation of spatial gene expression patterns, and the identification of spatial relationships between mapped cell types in the visual cortex. Our work presents a strategy for comprehensive integration of single cell data, including the assembly of harmonized references, and the transfer of information across datasets. Availability: Installation instructions, documentation, and tutorials are available at: https://www.satijalab.org/seurat

20: Deep Learning-Based Point-Scanning Super-Resolution Imaging
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Posted to bioRxiv 21 Aug 2019

Deep Learning-Based Point-Scanning Super-Resolution Imaging
1,736 downloads bioinformatics

Linjing Fang, Fred Monroe, Sammy Weiser Novak, Lyndsey Kirk, Cara R. Schiavon, Seungyoon B. Yu, Tong Zhang, Melissa Wu, Kyle Kastner, Yoshiyuki Kubota, Zhao Zhang, Gulcin Pekkurnaz, John Mendenhall, Kristen Harris, Jeremy Howard, Uri Manor

Point scanning imaging systems (e.g. scanning electron or laser scanning confocal microscopes) are perhaps the most widely used tools for high resolution cellular and tissue imaging. Like all other imaging modalities, the resolution, speed, sample preservation, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of point scanning systems are difficult to optimize simultaneously. In particular, point scanning systems are uniquely constrained by an inverse relationship between imaging speed and pixel resolution. Here we show these limitations can be mitigated via the use of deep learning-based super-sampling of undersampled images acquired on a point-scanning system, which we termed point-scanning super-resolution (PSSR) imaging. Oversampled, high SNR ground truth images acquired on scanning electron or Airyscan laser scanning confocal microscopes were 'crappified' to generate semi-synthetic training data for PSSR models that were then used to restore real-world undersampled images. Remarkably, our EM PSSR model could restore undersampled images acquired with different optics, detectors, samples, or sample preparation methods in other labs. PSSR enabled previously unattainable 2nm resolution images with our serial block face scanning electron microscope system. For fluorescence, we show that undersampled confocal images combined with a multiframe PSSR model trained on Airyscan timelapses facilitates Airyscan-equivalent spatial resolution and SNR with ~100x lower laser dose and 16x higher frame rates than corresponding high-resolution acquisitions. In conclusion, PSSR facilitates point-scanning image acquisition with otherwise unattainable resolution, speed, and sensitivity.

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